Donald Trump, Harold Hamm and Kevin Cramer

Most of my Democratic friends have a hard time understanding why I like Kevin Cramer. I think it’s because they’ve never been a part of a brotherhood. Let me explain.

I’m thinking about this today because of Gary Emineth’s announcement yesterday that Kevin Cramer would run for the U.S. Senate against Heidi Heitkamp. Thanks for that, Gary. I’m sure Kevin is grateful as well. Saved him a whole bunch of time and trouble putting together an announcement statement and lining up a place for a press conference and notifying the media and all the rigamarole that goes with announcing a campaign.

A couple of my Republican friends told me they are disappointed in the way things turned out. I think they wanted Emineth to run, and Kevin to stay in the House. Well, me too. More about that in a minute.

I’ll give you a couple names of people who are not disappointed.

Hey, Kevin . . .

Donald Trump and Harold Hamm. The two of them were the most instrumental in getting Kevin to change his mind, after he announced he would seek re-election to the House and not make the race for the Senate. Both put some persuasive pressure on Kevin to run against Heidi, but I’m told it was Hamm who closed the deal, after Trump had called Kevin and been turned down.

Harold Hamm, the deal closer.

I don’t know what Hamm promised, but it must have been significant, because Kevin was pretty sure, to the point of a public announcement, he would seek re-election to what most people consider a safe seat, and now he’s giving up a lot of security on a big gamble.

Well, of course, as of today this is all speculation, because there’s no formal announcement yet from Kevin, and likely no one except Harold and Kevin know what the deal was.

I’m disappointed because I’ve considered Kevin a friend for many years, and I don’t like it when my friends lose elections, no matter what party they belong to. And he’s pretty likely going to lose against Heidi. Which is okay, I guess. Even good, in fact, because Heidi’s been my friend longer than Kevin, and we all know the importance of seniority in politics.

I’ve known Heidi since her 1984 campaign for North Dakota State Auditor. Anybody else remember that? I got to know Kevin in 1992, when he was chairman and executive director of the North Dakota Republican Party. He was a good one, unlike most of those party hacks who preceded him. But I need to back up a minute.

I had the job of executive director of the other party, the Democratic-NPL Party, in 1984, the year Bud Sinner got elected Governor. I’m not boasting when I say I played a pretty significant role in his election. After the election, as his transition team began filling available jobs in the Capitol, I got a call from Joe Lamb, who was chairing the transition team, asking me if I wanted a job in government. I said I was pretty happy with what I was doing, but if it meant a pay raise, I’d consider it.

I considered it, but I stayed on in my job with the Democratic-NPL Party until summer, meanwhile looking around at what might be the best job in state government that I dared ask for. I found one. I called Chuck Fleming, who had been Sinner’s campaign manager and then became his chief of staff in the Governor’s Office, and said a really cool job would be the manager of Lake Metigoshe State Park. I loved parks, and I loved camping, and I loved the Turtle Mountains, and I told Chuck that if I could manage a whole state political party, surely I could manage one square mile in the Turtle Mountains. Chuck said he would see what he could do.

A few days later he called me back and said “Sorry, but you have to be QUALIFIED to get that job.” Turns out it is a civil service position that falls under the state’s personnel system, not subject to patronage. Dang.

But Chuck had another idea. He said I might make a pretty good State Tourism Director, and that job might come available. Well, I didn’t know much about tourism, but I knew enough about marketing, which was what the job was all about, and apparently you didn’t have to be QUALIFIED to take THAT job, so I took it.

I wasn’t prepared for the phone call the next day from a reporter from The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead asking me what my qualifications were to be Tourism Director. I stammered out something like “Well, I know the state pretty well, and I’ve camped in every state park in North Dakota . . .”

The answer looked pretty lame in the paper the next day, but somehow I got by that and had a fun 7 years in the Tourism Office.

Fast forward to 1992, November. I resigned from the Tourism Office that fall, and Ed Schafer got elected Governor. Not long after the election, I ran into Kevin Cramer at lunch time at the Peacock Alley in downtown Bismarck, and I congratulated him on a great campaign and on getting Ed, who I liked immensely (and who I had voted for), elected Governor.

And I said that now, precedent had been set—Sinner got elected on my watch, and I became Tourism Director, so now it was his turn. And, I said, it is the best job in state government (way better than being a state park manager).

Well, it took Kevin a few months to warm to the idea, but eventually he did it, and held that post a few years, joining the Brotherhood of North Dakota Tourism Directors. I was only the fourth person to hold that job in the state’s history, and Kevin became the sixth. Ed kept Tracy Potter, who was Deputy Tourism Director when I was there, in the job on an interim basis, until Kevin was ready to leave his post with the party and go to work in government, so Tracy was fifth.

The rest is history. Kevin did a fine job, got promoted to Economic Development Director, ran for Congress a couple times and lost (if you went through his bank statements from his 1996 and 1998 campaigns, you’d find a couple of checks from me in there—sorry, Earl), and he finally did get elected to Congress a dozen or so years later.

Kevin Cramer – an unlikely senator

He should stay there. He can continue to make as many BAD votes there as he wants to without really doing any harm. Although young Ben Hanson, the Democrat running for that job, would give him a pretty good run for his money. It’s going to be a darn good year for Democrats, and Ben’s a darn good candidate, and you never know . . .

What I do know is that Ben is the third person, behind Trump and Hamm, who’s really happy to see Kevin make the jump, if that is what happens this week. His job as a candidate just got a whole lot easier, no matter who the Republicans run for that seat.

Questions remain.

  • What of Tom Campbell, the only other serious Republican in the Senate race? He’s rich, and could primary Cramer, just like Cramer primaried Brian Kalk six years ago. If not, Campbell could run for the House.
  • But who else might want that House seat? Maybe someone who had it once before, like Rick Berg? That could make for an interesting state convention, and/or primary.
  • And what of Gary Emineth? Well, he’s embarrassed the party by calling the President of the United States (not the current one, but if the shoe fits . . .) a Piece Of Shit in a Facebook post, and might be tempted, but he’s unlikely to get a party endorsement any more. That’s why he pulled out of the Senate race and made Kevin’s announcement for him.

Could I make a prediction? Well, partly. Anticipating this possibility, young Mr. Hanson got out there really early and pretty much has a lock on the Democratic-NPL slot. Smart kid. But an open seat for Congress could draw a flood of Republicans to the race. I wouldn’t be surprised to see as many as half a dozen.

But let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves in this Senate race. Let’s wait for Kevin to come home and talk to us. To paraphrase Priscilla Alden, “Why don’t you speak for yourself, Kevin?”

8 thoughts on “Donald Trump, Harold Hamm and Kevin Cramer

  1. Since we are into bragging, I was the district chair who made it possible for Fleming to be George Sinner’s helper. We defeated that 10 year incumbent house member. Of course truth be told, and one should be cautious of speaking ill of the dead, but Chuck did shoot himself in the foot and the district was changing from becoming a very mixed district to becoming so Republican today that the Republicans shoot one another and the democrats can’t even get a candidate. So sad what has happened to our state. As for me, I always thought it was a better place when the voters kicked the incumbents out every now and then.

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    1. But Big Oil doesn’t own the North Dakota voters, they have their own minds, and can think for themselves if given fact-based information. Harold Hamm actually isn’t Big Oil, even though he’s a billionaire oil company owner. His company is considered to be an independent. Big Oil is British Petroleum, Exxon, Shell, the major oil companies, most of which aren’t active in North Dakota because it’s so expensive to drill so deep.

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  2. Politics aiside, Jim, you just evoked one of my all-time favorite outdoors memories. I was cross-country skiing in the International Peace Garden on Lake Metigoshe, probably 1979, and I didn’t know whether I was in Canada or the USA.Beautiful day, perfect temp, sunny, a great day to be alive. Wonderful feeling of freedom and adventure! Is it even possible to do that anymore?

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  3. I think you should examine in more detail just how smart your Mr. Hanson is. I caught a short snippet of him on a morning radio show and he didn’t know the basics of taxation in this state. I’m not voting for an individual that hasn’t paid taxes or doesn’t know how taxes work.

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